Planter 2010 Celebration
in Nova Scotia

250th Anniversary
1760-2010


Home Governor's
Proclamations
1757  '58  '59
Board
of
Trade
Historical
Biographies
Seven
Years
War


Annotated

Index of biographies
of people prominent
in Nova Scotia history
in the mid-1700s

Jonathan Belcher (1710-1776)
Chief Justice and Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia

Edward Boscawen (1711-1761)
Royal Navy officer

Richard Bulkeley (1717-1800)
Provincial secretary, councillor, brigadier-general of the provincial militia

Silvanus Cobb (1710-1762)
mariner, military officer

Bruin R. Comingo (1723-1820)
wool-comber, fisherman, German Reformed minister

Robert Denison (1697-1765)
soldier, settler, MLA

J.F.W. DesBarres (1721-1824)
army officer, military engineer, surveyor, colonizer, and colonial administrator

Charles Lawrence (1709-1760)
Governor of Nova Scotia

Charles Morris (1711-1781)
army officer, surveyor, judge

Silas T. Rand (1810-1889)
Baptist clergyman, missionary, philologist, and ethnologist

Patrick Sutherland (fl.1746-1766)
military officer

This is a work in progress.
Additional entries are in preparation.


User-Friendly

These biographies have been formatted to be much more "user-friendly" than most websites now allow.

The formatting of these biographies includes two features that enable you the viewer to exercise complete control over the presentation, so that you can adjust the on-screen appearance of the text to suit your own individual preference.

One of these features is now widely available, but the other is rare.

(1) If you find that a larger size of type makes the text easier to read, you can use your browser controls to adjust the size of the type as you like.  Of course, this feature is now available in most browsers; there is nothing special about it here.


The Special Feature

(2) When you are viewing these biographies, you can adjust the length of each line of text to be longer or shorter, as you like — without encountering the regrettably-common difficulty of some of the text disappearing off-screen.

You know this experience all too well – you open a website that interests you only to find that the lines of text are so long that some of the words disappear off the screen.  To read the text, you have to scroll to the right to read the end of the first line of text.  Then you have to scroll to the left to read the beginning of the second line of text.  Then you have to scroll to the right to read the end of the second line of text.  Then you have to scroll to the left to read the beginning of the third line of text.  And so on all the way to the end.

This effect is so common that many people – viewers and website administrators alike – think it is the normal way that things work in websites.  This is the way it is, and this is the way it has to be.

However, that common impression is wrong, as these biographical notes demonstrate.

If you like, you can see this for yourself right now.  No doubt you are viewing this note in an on-screen "window."  Try using your cursor to move one side of the window inward, so that the window becomes narrower.  Either side will work.  You can move the left side toward the right, or you can move the right side toward the left. 

As you resize the window, watch the on-screen text.  As you reduce the window width, your browser automatically adjusts the number of words in each line of text so that no line of text becomes too long to be visible without horizontal scrolling.  Every word in every line of text can be read without horizontal scrolling.

This works in the same way when you increase the type size.  Every word in every line of text can be read without horizontal scrolling.

You can use these two user-friendly adjustments – type size combined with window width – to make the text on your screen comfortable and convenient for you to read.

Annotated

Annotation:  Supplementary explanations provided for words or phrases; explanatory notes added to or supplied with a text; editorial comments published adjacent to but not part of a text.

In these biographies, care has been taken to present accurately the original source text.  The annotation has been added in a way that is unambiguously separated from the text attributable to the original source.  If the text is read as presented on-screen, without any intervention by the viewer using his/her mouse cursor, that text is an accurate presentation of the original source text.

The annotation – which can be made visible only by using the viewer's mouse cursor – is provided in two forms:

(1)  As a hyperlink pointing toward additional information related to the subject  As is true for all hyperlinks, this additional information can be accessed or not as the viewer chooses.

(2)  As a tooltip comment.  A tooltip is a short block of text that appears on-screen – with information about the item being hovered over – only when a user hovers the mouse cursor over, but does not click on, a word or phrase.  In this website, text that is equipped with a tooltip comment is identified by being displayed against a pale yellow background.


Note: People using the Internet Explorer (MSIE) browser may sometimes not see all of the text in the tooltip comment. The MSIE browser cuts off any text exceeding an arbitrary limit set by Microsoft.





This webpage has been archived

Index of biographies of Planters
prominent in Nova Scotia history

(1755-1775)

Index of biographies of Planters prominent in Nova Scotia history
http://archive.is/planter2010.ca/bio/biography-ndx.html

More Historic Biographies
http://archive.is/planter2010.ca/bio/*

And more Historic Biographies
http://archive.is/ns1763.ca/bio/*



Valid HTML 4.01 webpage

W3C HTML Validation Service
http://validator.w3.org/

Valid CSS webpage

W3C CSS Validation Service
http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/

W3C Unicorn Validation Service
http://validator.w3.org/unicorn/

This site can be viewed with any browser.


First uploaded to the WWW:   11 December 2009
Latest update:   13 November 2013