Board of Trade
and Plantations

Items relevant to
Nova Scotia
1760


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1757  '58  '59
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Annotated


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
January 1760

Friday, January 4, 1760

Read a letter from Mr. Shelvocke, Secretary to the Post Master General, to the Secretary of this Board, dated the 21st December last, complaining of the pacquetNOTE 1 boats for North America having been unreasonably detained at New York, and signifying a request of the Post Master General, that the Board would give directions to the Governor of New York never to detain the pacquet boat in turn to sail, longer than may be necessary for his Majesty's service, and especially when there are two or more pacquets lying at New York.

NOTE 1: In 1753 Benjamin Franklin was appointed deputy postmaster general for
the British colonies (which then included Placentia (Newfoundland), Nova Scotia,
New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South
Carolina).  In 1755 Franklin organized the first regular scheduled mail service
between England and North America – one trip each month by a 'packet' boat –
a regular service operating on a published schedule, carrying the mail, valuable
freight and first class passengers – and opened the first official post office, in
what is now Canada, in Halifax to link Nova Scotia with the other Atlantic colonies
and the packet service to England.  The mail from England that was destined for
Halifax went first to New York, and was carried to Halifax from New York on any
available vessel.  Any disruption in the packet service between New York and
Falmouth (England) had a direct effect on the mail service to and from Nova Scotia.

[This note does not appear in the original Board of Trade records.]


Ordered, that the Secretary do write to Mr. Delancey, Lieutenant Governor of New York, upon the subject of this complaint, conformable to what is requested by the Post Master General; and that he do acquaint Mr. Shelvocke with the order which the Board has given thereupon.

Tuesday, January 22, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board an account of money paid and charges incurred for supporting and maintaining the settlement of his Majesty's colony of Nova Scotia for the year 1758, prepared by the agent pursuant to order; and it appearing upon the face of the said account, that the expences incurred had exceeded the estimate for that year in the sum of five thousand, eight hundred and fifty one pounds, four shillings and nine pence, it was ordered that the agent should compare and examine the said account with the particulars of the estimate, and state to their lordships, upon what articles the said exceedings have been incurred.

Read a letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated November 23rd, 1759, informing their lordships of his proceedings with respect to the Cape Sable Indians; and inclosing

A return of the number of French prisonersNOTE 2 taken at Cape Sable in the province of Nova Scotia, and shipped off on board the ship Mary the fourth, William Daverson, master, at Halifax, 9th November, 1759.

NOTE 2: These “French prisoners” included about 40 Acadian (French)
families consisting of “about 150 souls,” living in the vicinity of the Tusket
River in what is now Yarmouth County, who had escaped the 1756 expulsion
by “hiding in the woods.”  In 1758, their existence became known to the
British authorities in Halifax, who decided to have them apprehended.
The task of picking them (the Acadians of Cape Sable) up was entrusted
to Captain Joseph Gorham In October 1758, Gorham sent an Acadian
with a letter addressed to those who were hiding in the woods, whom he
summoned to give themselves up.  In reply they sent him a letter, telling
him that they had written to the Governor of Massachusetts to see to it that
they would be able to stay on their lands or at least to accept them in his
territory.  A copy of this letter of the Acadians, which is in English, has
survived.  It is dated from “Cape Sables, September 15th, 1758”, and
addressed “To His Excellency Thomas Pownall, esq. and Honourable
Council in Boston.”  The previous winter had been exceptionally long and
severe.  “These Acadians were not able to face again such a winter in the
woods; that is why they were ready to do anything to avoid another harsh
winter, anything except to fall into the custody of Governor Lawrence, who
was regarded by the Acadians as a heartless tyrant.” The letter was given
to Mark Haskell, a merchant who was dealing with the Acadians of Cape
Sable.  He was to convey it to the Governor of Massachusetts.  “No doubt
the letter had been written by Haskell himself.”  Governor Pownall was very
sympathetic to the plea of the Acadians.  He would have wanted to send
someone right away to get them, but his Council was of another opinion.
Their argument was that these Acadians were “enemies of the Crown.”
Since they had pledged to stay neutral in case of war and being of French
extraction, they were considered to be more partisans of France than English
subjects.  Moreover, England and France had been at war since 17 May 1756,
the Seven Years War.  Thus Massachusetts could not give shelter to these
“enemies.”  Joseph Gorham arrived in Halifax with them on 29 June 1759;
they were 152 in all.  They were placed on Georges Island, in Halifax Harbour,
where there were already six Acadian prisoners from the St. John River.
“Here, where they were to stay till November, they had much to suffer,
sleeping 'under the stars,' most of them not having anything to cover
themselves, their clothes having been taken away from them.  Eight died
on the island; there was one birth.”  They were scheduled to be shipped
to England on 3 November 1759.  They had already boarded the ship
Mary the Fourth, when, that same evening, rose one of the worst storms
ever to hit the coast of Nova Scotia.  This was the memorable storm of the
night of 3-4 November 1759, one of the most destructive storms to hit
Nova Scotia in the eighteenth century.  The departure was postponed till
the 10th.  They arrived in England seven weeks later, on December 29th.
Finally, they disembarked in Cherbourg, France, on 14 January 1760.
Four had died during the crossing.

—Excerpted and adapted from Article #33 by Father Clarence-J. d'Entremont
in the Yarmouth Vanguard (weekly newspaper), 15 August 1989,
and other sources

[This note does not appear in the original Board of Trade records.]


Directions for coming into the harbour of Halifax.

A chart of the said harbour.

Ordered, that the Secretary do desire the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to move their lordships to refer the said chart and paper of directions to be examined by any of the Captains of his Majesty's ships acquainted with the navigation of the port of Halifax, to the end that if the said chart and directions be found correct, proper measures may be taken for the publication of them for the benefit of the trade and navigation of his Majesty's subjects.

Thursday, January 24, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board the following paper, prepared by the agent of Nova Scotia pursuant to order; viz.

Account of the particulars of the estimate of money granted by Parliament for the support of the settlement of Nova Scotia for the year 1758, compared with the account of the actual expences of that year, shewing the exceedings under each head and article thereof.

Tuesday, January 29, 1760

Read a letter from Mr. West, Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, to Mr. Pownall, dated 28th January, 1760, desiring him to acquaint this Board, that it is his Majesty's command, that they should lay before the House of Commons an estimate of the expence of supporting the colony of Nova Scotia for the year 1760.

The draught of an estimate of the expence of supporting and maintaining the settlement of his Majesty's colony of Nova Scotia for the year 1760, having been accordingly prepared, was agreed to, and transcribed; and Mr. Hamilton was desired to present it to the House of Commons pursuant to his Majesty's commands.

The Earl of Halifax communicated to the Board the following paper, presented to his lordship by several merchants and others concerned in the trade to the Northern Colonies, viz.

Reasons for allowing bountys upon the importation of hemp, flax and silk from the British American Colonys.

Ordered, that the Secretary do write to the Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs, to desire he would move that Board to give directions, that the following accounts be made out and transmitted to their lordships, viz.

An account of the quantity of hemp imported into England from the British colonies in America between the 1st of January, 1712, and the 1st of January, 1728.

An account of the quantity of pig or bar iron importedNOTE 3 into England from the British colonies in America between the 1st of January, 1750, and the 1st of January, 1759.

NOTE 3: This “iron imported into England from the British colonies
in America” was an important component of the early industrial
development of these colonies – which later reached into Nova Scotia
(for example the Annapolis Iron Mining Company, organized in the 1820s
in what is now Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, which constructed and
operated a furnace for smelting iron and a forge and trip hammer for
producing pig iron).  The Iron Act of 1750 was passed by the British
Parliament to encourage production of iron in quantity in the colonies
in the form of pig iron and bar iron; also to prevent manufacturing of
finished iron products in the colonies.  This Act required that no mill
or other engine for rolling or slitting iron, no plating forge to work with
a tilt hammer, nor any furnace for making steel, should be erected in
the North American colonies, but exempting the country forges which
made bolts and nails and common farm implements.  The statute of
1750 favored American bar iron and pig iron by removing the duties
to which they had hitherto been subject on importation to England,
while leaving intact those on Swedish and other foreign iron.  This
was done for immediate political motives, in the hope of rendering
England independent of foreign sources of supply; and also for
mercantilist motives, to check the supposed drain of specie.  But
to the credit of the government it may be remarked that the concession
was granted in the teeth of much opposition from English iron-masters
and owners of woodlands, and even from farmers.  The consequence
of the removal of the duties was that in four years the quantity of
colonial pig iron imported into England increased by one-half; and
that it began, for the first time, to be profitable to carry bar iron
over the North Atlantic Ocean.

—Source: "The Commercial Legislation of England and
the American Colonies, 1660-1760" by W.J. Ashley.
Quarterly Journal of Economics v14 (November 1899) pages 1-29
[made available online by Dinsmore Documentation].

[This note does not appear in the original Board of Trade records.]



Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
February 1760

Friday, February 1, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board the following Orders of the House of Commons, viz.
"Martis 29o die Januarii 1760".

"Ordered: That there be laid before this House an account of the money paid, and charges incurred, by supporting and maintaining the settlement of his Majesty's colony of Nova Scotia from the 1st of January, 1758, to the 31st of December following.

"Ordered: That there be laid before this House an account of the money paid, and charges incurred, by supporting and maintaining the settlement of his Majesty's colony of Nova Scotia from the 1st of January, 1759, to the 31st of December following."

The account of the money paid and charges incurred by supporting and maintaining the settlement of Nova Scotia for the year 1758, prepared by the agent, and mentioned in the minutes of the 22nd ult., having been again laid before the Board, Mr. Hamilton was desired to present it to the House of Commons; and at the same time to acquaint the House, that the latter order for laying before them an account of the money paid, and charges incurred by supporting and maintaining the settlement of Nova Scotia for the year 1759, cannot be at present complied with, by reason the proper officers in the said colony have not transmitted any accounts of the expenditure, or any vouchers for the payment of money for the year 1759: but that as soon as the accounts and vouchers shall be received, the account shall be made up with all possible dispatch, and laid before the House.

The Secretary laid before the Board a memorial, prepared by the agent for Nova Scotia, to be presented to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, praying that the sum of four thousand, five hundred pounds may be issued to him to discharge two bills drawn upon him by the Governor of that province for the purchase of dollars for the use of the government; and the said memorial having been approved, it was ordered, that the agent should present it to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, for their lordships' directions upon it.

The Secretary having observed to the Board, that great inconveniencies had arison from the Acts of each session of Assembly in Nova Scotia, Massachusets Bay, New Jersey and Barbados having been transmitted in one collection under one Seal, he was ordered to write to the Governors of the said colonies, to desire they would give orders to the proper officers to take care for the future, that each Act was sent separately under the Seal, as directed by his Majesty's instructions.

Tuesday, February 12, 1760

Read a letter from Mr. Wood, Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs, to Mr. Pownall, dated the 7th February, 1760, inclosing the following accounts, viz.

An account of the quantities of hemp imported into England from the British American Colonies from Christmas 1712 to Christmas 1728, distinguishing each year.

An account of the quantities of pig and barr iron imported into England from the British American Colonies from Christmas 1750 to Christmas 1758, distinguishing each year.

Tuesday, February 19, 1760

General Cornwallis, attending upon the subject matter of the papers referred to him on the 7th of December last concerning the claims of the widow of the late Captain How, employed in his Majesty's service in Nova Scotia in the years 1749 and 1750, acquainted their lordships, that it was not his intention to have allowed the said Captain How twenty shillings per day and above the allowance to him of ten shillings per day as Commissary and Judge Advocate: but that he meant only to make Captain How's pay twenty shillings per day in the whole.

Ordered, that the Secretary do acquaint the Governor with what General Cornwallis has represented upon this subject.

Wednesday, February 20, 1760

Read the following letters and papers received from the Governor of Nova Scotia, viz.

Letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated 10th December, 1759, in answer to their lordships' letter of the 1st of August last, and in justification of his conduct in passing grants of part of the evacuated lands, without waiting for further orders from hence.

Letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated 27th December, 1759, transmitting several publick papers.

Address of the Assembly to Governor Lawrence, dated 24th December, 1759, setting forth the necessity of making some provision for the poorer sort of grantees of the new townships, to support them, until the dykes, which have been carried away by a violent inundation,NOTE 4 can be repaired.

NOTE 4: This “violent inundation” was the memorable storm of the night of
3-4 November 1759, one of the most destructive storms to hit Nova Scotia in the
eighteenth century.  It wreaked heavy damage along Nova Scotia's coast, from
the wharves at Halifax to the Bay of Fundy.  Seafarers have known for centuries
that the arrival of a strong (unusually-low barometric pressure) storm at a coast,
at the time of a high tide, is an event to be wary of – if this happens to coincide
with an astronomical perigean syzygy then serious consequences will occur.
This storm coincided with the exceptionally-strong Full Moon Perigean Syzygy
that peaked in the early afternoon of November 4, 1759, with perigee and syzygy
less than nine hours apart and the Moon's perigean distance only 356,850 km.
The lunar perigee distance varies from a maximum of about 370,500 km to a
minimum of about 356,400 km.  Any perigean syzygy produces strong
tide-raising forces.  The strongest tidal effect is produced by the shortest
preigee distance, and on November 4, 1759, the lunar perigee distance
was within 500 km of the shortest possible distance.

[This note does not appear in the original Board of Trade records.]


Copy of the Memorial of a committee and proprietors of an intended township at Annapolis, setting forth the damage done by the late inundation; the want of a sufficient quantity of cleared land, on which to settle the number of families specified in the grant; and praying relief.

Copy of the Memorial of a committee for the proprietors of the township of Liverpool at Port Segnior, praying, for the reasons set forth, that the settlers may be transported at the expence of the Government, and have an allowance of provisions.

Letter from Mr. Lawrence, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated 12th January, 1760, transmitting the following papers.

Address of the General Assembly to the Governor, praying that he would use his interest with this Board, that a minister and schoolmaster may be sent over for the service of the settlement at Lunenburg.

Estimate of stationery wanted at the publick offices at Halifax for the year 1760.

Number of panes of glass requisite for the lanthorn of the lighthouse.

Ordered, that the two last mentioned papers be delivered to the agent for the settlement of Nova Scotia, to the end he may procure the particulars therein required.

Thursday, February 21, 1760

Their lordships took into consideration the several letters and papers lately received from the Governor of Nova Scotia; and, after some time spent therein, ordered the draught of a letter to him, in answer thereto, to be prepared.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
March 1760

Tuesday, March 4, 1760

The Secretary laid before their lordships an Order of his Majesty in Council, approving a representation of this Board upon the proceedings of the Governor and Council of Nova Scotia in granting out the lands in that province evacuated by the removal of the French inhabitants, and ordering the said Governor and Council to carry the measure into effectual execution upon the terms proposed.

Ordered, that the said Order in Council be transmitted to Mr. Lawrence by the next packet.

Friday, March 7, 1760

The draught of a letter to the Governor of Nova Scotia, in answer to several received from him, having been prepared pursuant to order, was agreed to, transcribed and signed; and the Secretary was ordered to send it by the pacquet to the Lieutenant Governor of New York, and desire him to forward it to Halifax by the first safe conveyance.

Tuesday, March 11, 1760

The Secretary acquainted the Board with some particulars, relative to the disposition of the cattle and stockNOTE 5 belonging to the French inhabitants of Nova Scotia, and left there by them upon their removal in 1755; which particulars had been communicated to him by Mr. Grant, one of the Council of that province and lately arrived from thence.

NOTE 5: What happened to the to the “cattle and stock belonging to the
French inhabitants of Nova Scotia, and left there by them upon their removal
in 1755”?  After the Acadians were expelled from the Annapolis Valley region
of Nova Scotia, their abandoned livestock were left to fend for themselves.
In his book History of the County of Lunenburg, (page 47) M.B. DesBrisay
quotes others "On July 30th 1756, Captain John Steignfort, with fifty armed
men went from Lunenburg to the Basin of Minas, and drove away 120 head
of horned cattle and a number of horses, being part of the confiscated
property of the French Acadians.  The party returned to Lunenburg,
September 3rd, with sixty oxen and cows, the rest having perished on the
way – all the horses included."  See below for a further discussion of this
question – what happened to the cattle and stock...?

[This note does not appear in the original Board of Trade records.]


Their lordships, upon consideration of the said particulars, having reason to apprehend, that the said cattle and stock might not have been duly and properly accounted for to the Crown, ordered the Secretary to give notice to Mr. Grant to attend the Board on Thursday next, the 13th instant.

Ordered that the Secretary do give notice to the agent for the settlement to attend the Board to-morrow morning.

Wednesday, March 12, 1760

Their lordships entered into a consideration of the particulars communicated to the Secretary by Mr. Grant, with respect to the cattle and stock left in Nova Scotia by the French inhabitants upon their removal in 1755, and several accounts of moneys received and paid in the years 1756, 1757, and 1758, produced by the agent, were examined.

Thursday, March 13, 1760

Their lordships took into further consideration the subject matter of yesterday's deliberation, respecting the disposition of the cattle and stock left in Nova Scotia by the French inhabitants upon their removal in 1755; and Mr. Grant, attending pursuant to order, was called in, whose information upon this matter was in substance as follows, viz.

That he never knew exactly what number of cattle the French inhabitants left behind them; that he had once seen an account of those left in the districts of Menis, Canard, Piziquid and the other adjacent settlements, by which they amounted to 10,000 head of horned cattle, exclusive of those at Annapolis; that he understood from information, that the troops in the out garrisons were victualled with these cattle, they having been caught by persons employed by Mr. Saul, the Commissary and agent for the contractors; that many would be lost by the severity of the winter; that a thousand head were driven to Halifax, some of which were sold; and that he bought of Mr. Saul about 60 or 100 head at about 4 pounds per head; that the Governor gave leave to particular persons to drive some down to Halifax (about two or three hundred) for their own private advantage; that Mr. Mauger, the Agent Victualler for the Fleet, brought down about seven hundred, and brought the publick in debt to him about twenty eight pounds for the expence of catching them; that he did not know what number of cattle there might have been in the whole, but that it was said, there was six thousand head in Annapolis district; that he cannot tell, what number of sheep was left; that a few were brought to Halifax, but not being properly taken care of, were wasted; that a person, who was sometime clerk to Mr. Saul, told him, that Saul had salted four or five thousand hogs at Piziquid; that upon an audit of Saul's accounts by himself and another of the Council, he well remembers, that Saul had given credit to the publick for about two thousand pounds on account of these cattle and stock.

That the people of Lunenburg had some of the horses; and that many were now in use at Halifax; that he never heard of any cattle sold by others than Mauger and Saul, or those to whom they were given in charity.

It having appeared from an examination of the publick accounts of the colony, that a large sum was charged in the account of the year 1757 for flour bought of Mr. Saul, the Commissary, at fifteen shillings the hundred weight; Mr. Grant was desired to inform the Board, what the price of flour was in the years 1756, 1757 and 1758, whose information upon that matter was as follows, viz.

That from July, 1755, to October, 1758, flour at an average never exceeded eight shillings the hundred, or eight shillings and six pence at most; that this cheapness was owing to a large quantity of prize flour brought in; that Philadelphia flour has sold for twelve shillings and six pence to thirteen shillings; but scarce any of that came to market at Halifax within that period, or at least only a small quantity; that prize flour was in common use in the province, and that he had bought some of Mr. Saul for fifteen shillings the barrel, which is two hundred and five pounds; that notice was taken in the Council of the high price charged to the publick for flour; and a proposal was made, that they should have the contract, which would supply the cheapest; upon which Mr. Saul promised, that he would furnish it so cheap, that no fault should be found for the future.

Mr. Grant being withdrawn, their lordships agreed to consider further of this affair on Tuesday next; and the Secretary was ordered to give notice to General Winslow and Mr. Sanderson, late Speaker of the House of Representatives of Nova Scotia, to attend on that day.

Tuesday, March 18, 1760

Their lordships took into further consideration the subject matter under deliberation on the last day of meeting, respecting the disposition of the cattle and stock left in Nova Scotia upon the removal of the French inhabitants in 1755; and General Winslow, attending without pursuant to order, was called in; whose information upon this matter was in substance as follows, viz.

That the troops under his command in Nova Scotia, whilst at Beausejour, were victualled with salt provisions; that when he was sent with a detachment to Menis, they had only fourteen days' provisions; that from the 14th of August, 1755, to the 13th of September following, his command at Menis in Nova Scotia, officers included, consisted of 313 men, till the 13th of September, when he received a reinforcement, which made them 363, continued at that number till the 11th of November, when he went with one part to Halifax, Captains Adams and Hobbs with one hundred men to Annapolis, the remains left with Captain Osgood at Menis; and that during the time that the troops were at that place, they were victualled about one half of that time with fresh provisions; that they killed out of the stock that did belong to the French inhabitants, which, together with their lands, was declared forfeited to the Crown; that he settled accounts with the agent for the contractor, in which credit was given to the Crown for the fresh provisions the troops had been supplied with.

That some of the cattle was drove over to Halifax by order of Mr. Mauger, the Agent Victualler for the Fleet, as he understood for the use of the fleet; that a great part was left upon the spot; many of which probably perished in the winter for want of fodder; that he never heard, that any cattle was disposed of by sale, not being fit for slaughter.

That the live stock that belonged to the French inhabitants that were removed by him from the districts of Menis, Canard Rivers, Habiton and Gaspereau, and places adjacent, were

Oxen1,269
Cows1,557
Young cattle2,181
(total)5,007
Sheep8,690
Hogs4,197
Horses493

General Winslow being withdrawn, Mr. Sanderson, who also attended pursuant to order, was called in; whose information upon this matter was in substance as follows, viz.

That the general opinion at Halifax was, that there were large quantities of cattle left by the French inhabitants; it was said, twenty thousand head of horned cattle and ten thousand hogs; that they were not disposed of to the people; that they were taken by the Commissary, and that Mauger, the Agent Victualler, had a part; that he never heard, that any vessels went into the Bay of Fundy to purchase these cattle; that the people at Halifax were altogether ignorant of what passed or was done in that part of the province; that petitions were presented by the settlers for leave to catch some of these cattle, and that some few particular persons had been; and afterwards the cattle they caught were taken away from them; that he supposed the troops were victualled with these cattle, Mr. Saul having packed many thousand barrels of pork; and it was reported, that vessels had carried off salted provisions; that there was a proposal for victualling the people at Lunenburg with these cattle; but it did not take effect; for that cattle were brought for that purpose at a great expence from New England; that he supposes, if the cattle and stock had been sold, it would have produced twenty thousand pounds and upwards; that Mr. Saul, the agent for the contractor, had often spoke of the savings made to the contractor by supplying the troops with these provisions; and it was known, that the contractor had made Mr. Saul a present of three hundred pounds on that score.

That he thinks there must have been ten thousand head of these cattle taken by the Commissary and Agent Victualler; and that he is of opinion, there was a collusion between the Governor and Mr. Saul in this business.

That these and many other abuses may be discovered and detected by empowering proper persons from home to examine the officers and the persons employed by them, and to inspect the publick accounts.

Mr. Sanderson being asked as to the price of flour at Halifax in 1757, he said that he very well remembers, that it was said, that Mr. Saul had sold prize flour to the publick for fifteen shillings the hundred, for which he only gave fourteen shillings a barrel.

Mr. Sanderson being withdrawn, their lordships upon further consideration had of this matter, ordered, that the agent for the settlement should carefully examine the accounts of money received and expended for the service of Nova Scotia in the years 1756, 1757 and 1758, and state to their lordships, whether any or what credit has been given by the Commissary or any other officer or officers on account of the cattle and stock left in Nova Scotia upon the removal of the French inhabitants in 1755; and that the Secretary should write to the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury to acquaint him with the information which this Board has received upon this matter, and to desire he would move the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury to give orders to the proper officers to examine, whether any or what credit has been given to the publick by the Contractor for supplying the troops in that province with provisions on account of any part of the said cattle and stock supplied to the use of the said troops.

Friday, March 21, 1760

Read a memorial of the executors of the late John Gorham, Captain of the Independent Company of Rangers employed in the service of Nova Scotia, stating an account of pay and arrears due to the said Captain between the 25th August, 1749, and 15th December, 1751, and praying payment thereof out of such funds as shall be appropriated to the service of the said colony.

Ordered, that the agent for the affairs of the settlement of the said colony do examine the accounts of the said colony for the years 1749, 1750 and 1751, and state to their lordships what sums appear to have been paid to the said Captain Gorham on account of his subsistence and arrears between the 25th of August, 1749, and the 15th of December, 1751.

Wednesday, March 26, 1760

Read a letter from Richard Cumberland, Esquire, agent for the colony of Nova Scotia, to the Secretary, dated 24th March, 1760, acquainting him, that no credit appears, from the accounts of that colony, to have been given by the Commissary or other officers, on account of the cattle or stock left there upon the removal of the French inhabitants in 1755.

Friday, March 28, 1760

Read Sir Matthew Lamb's report, dated March 15th, 1760, upon the minutes of the proceedings of the Governor, Council and House of Representatives of the province of Nova Scotia, in the first session of the General Assembly of that province.

Ordered, that a copy of the said report be transmitted to Mr. Lawrence, with the Board's next letter to him.

Read a letter from William Adair, Esquire, to Mr. Pownall, dated March 27th, 1760, in behalf of the executors of the late Major General Hopson, praying him to move the Board to give orders, that Mr. Green, Treasurer of Nova Scotia, be permitted to come to England to pass some accounts of the said late General Hopson; and inclosing

Copy of Major General Hopson's Memorial to the Lords of the Treasury.

Copy of the Treasury minute relating to Major General Hopson's Memorial.

Ordered, that the Secretary do transmit a copy of the said Memorial to the Governor of Nova Scotia, and signify to him their lordships' desire, that he will give leave to Mr. Green to come to England, appointing a proper person to officiate in his stead during his absence.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
April 1760

Wednesday, April 23, 1760

Massachusetts
Read a letter from Governor Pownall, dated February 22nd, 1760, informing the Board of the receipt of their letters of 13th and 14th November last, of a general thanksgiving having been observed by the province; of the measures taken for carrying on the war; and expressing his grateful sense of their lordships' nomination of him to the government of South Carolina; and inclosing

Copy of the resolves of the legislature of the Massachusets Bay, relative to the making provision for the forces of the province in garrison at Louisbourg and Nova Scotia, and raising others for the service of the ensuing year.

Friday, April 25, 1760

Read a letter from Richard Cumberland, Esquire, agent for the settlement of Nova Scotia, to Mr. Pownall, dated March 28th, 1760, acquainting him with the sums he has discovered to have been paid to the late Captain Gorham for his subsistence and arrears between 25th August, 1748, and 15th December, 1751.

Upon consideration of the above mentioned letter, and the memorial in behalf of the executors of Captain Gorham, mentioned in the minutes of the 21st March last, their lordships agreed, that such-sums as should appear to be due on account of pay, subsistence and arrears of the said Captain Gorham, or on account of the Company of Rangers under his command, subsequent to the establishment of Nova Scotia, should be provided for by a special article, to be inserted in any estimate that should be laid before Parliament for the support of the settlement of Nova Scotia for the year 1761.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
May 1760

Thursday, May 1, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board a chart or draught of the harbour of Halifax in Nova Scotia, engraved by Mr. Jefferys, Geographer to his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, from the drawing transmitted to their lordships by the Governor of Nova Scotia: and the Secretary having at the same time acquainted the Board, that the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty had signified to him, that the said drawing was upon examination found to be correct and exact, their lordships ordered the Secretary to give Mr. Jefferys five guineas for his trouble, and signify to him, that he has the Board's permission to publish the said chart.

Ordered, that the Secretary do send one of the said charts to the Master of the New England and Nova Scotia Coffee house, to be put up there for the use and information of masters of vessels using the Nova Scotia trade.

The Secretary laid before the Board a Memorial prepared by the agent for Nova Scotia, to be presented to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, praying that the sum of five hundred and thirty pounds, nine shillings and four pence may be issued to him out of the money appropriated for the service of Nova Scotia, to discharge certain demands on account of the said service: and the memorial having been approved, the agent was ordered to present it to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury for their directions upon it.

[N.B.— This memorial was cancelled, June 5th, and the several articles of demand inserted in another memorial approved that day, vide folio 154.]

Read a Memorial of Robert Grant, Esquire, desiring the Board to give orders, that he be re-admitted to his seat in the Council of Nova Scotia, from which he has been irregularly dismissed by the Governor and Council of the said province.

Their lordships, upon consideration of the said memorial and of the tenth article of the general instructions, were of opinion, that, if the allegations, contained in the said memorial, of the memorialist's having been resident in different parts of the province during the time he was deemed to have been absent, are just and true, the Governor and Council were not warranted in declaring his seat void, and putting in another person in his stead; and the Secretary was ordered to prepare the draught of a letter to the Governor agreeable to this resolution.

Tuesday, May 13, 1760

The draught of a letter to the Governor of Nova Scotia, relative to the subject matter of Mr. Grant's memorial concerning his removal from the Council Board, having been prepared pursuant to order, was agreed to, and ordered to be transcribed.

Friday, May 16, 1760

The draught of a letter to the Governor of Nova Scotia, relative to the subject matter of Mr. Grant's memorial concerning his removal from the Council Board, having been transcribed pursuant to order, was signed.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
June 1760

Thursday, June 5, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board a Memorial [vide supra page 123], prepared by the agent for the settlement of Nova Scotia to be presented to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, praying that the sum of four thousand, four hundred and thirteen pounds, thirteen shillings and eleven pence may be issued to him out of the grant of Parliament for the support of that colony, to enable him to pay bills drawn upon him by the Governor for the ordinary service of government, and to discharge other demands on account of the said service: and the said memorial having been approved, it was ordered, that the agent should present it to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury for their lordships' directions upon it.

Thursday, June 12, 1760

Read a letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated 17th March, 1760, giving the Board an account of his reason for drawing on the agent for that colony for a sum of above £8,000; and acknowledging the receipt of their lordships' letter of 14th December last.

Friday, June 20, 1760

Read the following letter and papers received from the Governor of Nova Scotia, viz.

Letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated 11th May, 1760, in answer to their lordships' letter of 14th December last; and respecting his transactions with the Indians of St. John's River, and his measures for the settlement of the province.

Places in Nova Scotia where disbanded soldiers might be settled.

A list of the laws which have been passed in the General Assembly of the province of Nova Scotia, begun and holden at Halifax on the 4th day of December, 1759.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
July 1760

Tuesday, July 8, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board the following copies of Orders of his Majesty in Council received from the clerk of the Council in waiting, viz...

Copy of an Order of his Majesty in Council, dated September 12th, 1759, approving the draught of a Commission for Jeffery Amherst, Esquire, to be Governor of Virginia.

Copy of an Order of his Majesty in Council, dated November 9th, 1759, approving the draughts of general instructions and of those relating to trade for Jeffery Amherst, Esquire, Governor of Virginia...


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
September 1760

Monday, September 22, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board a Memorial, prepared by the agent for Nova Scotia to be presented to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, praying that four thousand, one hundred and sixty five pounds, four shillings and ten pence may be issued to him out of the monies appropriated by Parliament to the service of Nova Scotia, to discharge certain demands on account of the said service: And the said memorial having been approved, the agent was ordered to present it to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury for their lordships' directions upon it.




Note

Journal Volume 67 (above) began at the New Year, and concludes with the death of King George II on 25 October 1760.

Journal Volume 68 (below) begins, not as usual with the New Year, but with the accession of King George III on 25 October 1760, and continues down to the end of 1761.




Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
October 1760

Monday, October 27, 1760

Read an Order of his Majesty in Council, dated the 25th instant, directing this Board to prepare warrants for authorizing the respective publick Seals in the Plantations, made use of in the time of his late Majesty, to be made use of, until other Seals shall be prepared and sent thither, duly authorized by his Majesty; and to lay the said warrants before his Majesty in Council.

Whereupon the form of a Warrant, agreeable to the above order, having been prepared, was approved, and fair transcripts made, directed to the Governors of the following provinces and colonies, viz., Nova Scotia, Massachusets Bay, New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Bahamas, Bermuda, Leeward Islands, Barbados and Jamaica; and a representation to his Majesty in Council, with the said warrants, was agreed to and signed.

Wednesday, October 29, 1760

Read an Order of his Majesty in Council of the 27th instant, inclosing the draught of a proclamation, with blanks, for proclaiming the King in his Majesty's respective Plantations in America, and directing this Board to prepare as many draughts properly filled up for the several and respective colonies and plantations in America as shall be necessary, and present the same to his Majesty in Council.

Whereupon draughts properly filled up were prepared for proclaiming his Majesty in all the following places in America, viz.

Hudson's Bay
Montreal
Placentia in Newfoundland
Cape Breton
Nova Scotia
New Hampshire
Massachusets Bay
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Maryland
Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Bermudas
Leeward Islands
Guadeloupe
Barbados
Jamaica

and the said draughts having been approved, a representation to his Majesty thereupon, was signed. and proposing, that two vessels may be ordered to carry over the said proclamations and other necessary dispatches for America, was signed.

The Secretary having acquainted the Board, that notice had been sent to him by Mr. Pitt's Secretary, that an officer would be dispatched this day to North America; and that he had orders to take any dispatches which this Board have ready for the colonies; it was ordered, that the Secretary do write a Circular Letter to the several Governors and Commanders in Chief upon the Continent, acquainting them, that the necessary dispatches for proclaiming his Majesty in America, etc., etc., are preparing, and will be ready to be transmitted to them in a few days.

Thursday, October 30, 1760

Read an Order of his Majesty in Council on the 29th instant, directing this Board to prepare draughts of instructions to the Governors of the several colonies in America, for an alteration in the prayers for the Royal Family, conformable to the directions of his Majesty's Order in Council in that behalf of the 27th instant.

Whereupon draughts of instructions, conformable to the said order, were prepared for the Governors and Commanders in Chief of the following places, viz.

Nova Scotia
New Hampshire
Massachusets Bay
Connecticut
Rhode Island
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Maryland
Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Bermuda
Bahamas
Leeward Islands
Barbados
Jamaica

and the said draughts having been approved, a representation to his Majesty thereupon was signed.

Friday, October 31, 1760

The Secretary having acquainted the Board, that the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty had informed him, that one of his Majesty's ships of war now lay ready at Spithead to depart with the first fair wind for the West Indies, he was directed to write a Circular Letter to the Governors of Barbados, Leeward Islands, Guadeloupe and Jamaica, acquainting them that the necessary dispatches for proclaiming his Majesty in America, etc., etc., will be ready to be transmitted to them in a few days.

Read an Order of his Majesty in Council, dated this day, transmitting to this Board letters from the Privy Council to the Governors and Commanders in Chief of the British colonies in America, with orders for proclaiming his Majesty in the said colonies, and directing the Board to transmit them forthwith to the said colonies by the two vessels appointed for that purpose.

Whereupon letters to the several Governors and Commanders in Chief of the said colonies, accompanying the letters from the Privy Council, and inclosing proclamations for continuing all officers in America in their employments till his Majesty's pleasure is further known, together with his Majesty's warrants for using the old Seals, and instructions for altering the prayers for the Royal Family, were prepared, agreed to and signed; and the Secretary having acquainted their lordships, that the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty had transmitted to him letters to the captains of the two ships prepared for carrying the said orders, containing directions for receiving the same into their care and custody, he was ordered forthwith to dispatch the messenger with the said letters and orders to Portsmouth, to be put on board the said ships, and to transmit the duplicates of them for the West Indies by the packet, the mail for which is to be made up at the Post Office tonight, and the duplicates for the Continent by the first safe conveyance.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
November 1760

Tuesday, November 4, 1760

A representation to his Majesty, proposing that new Seals may be prepared for the colonies, was agreed to and signed.

Wednesday, November 5, 1760

Read the following letters and papers received from the Governor of Nova Scotia, viz.

Letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated June 16th, 1760, in answer to one from the Board of 7th of March, inclosing papers relating to the estimates of expences of the said colony, and giving an account of the number and quality of the persons lately arrived to settle the evacuated lands and an account of the damage done by the storms and inundations last fall.

Treaty of peace made with the St. John's and Passamaquody Tribes of Indians at Halifax in Nova Scotia, February 23rd, 1760.

Transcript from the record of a Court of Office held for escheats and forfeitures, at Halifax, April 21st, 1760.

Transcript of the trials of John Ludovick Boyard and Martha Orpin for murder, taken from the records of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Halifax, May 27th, 1760.

Mr. Saul, the Commissary's account of stores and provisions, audited to 10th June, 1759.

Records of Council, between 22nd August, 1759, and 22nd April, 1760.

Minutes of Council in General Assembly from 4th December, 1759, to 29th March, 1760.

Minutes of the House of Assembly from 4th December, 1759, to 29th March, 1760.

Twenty two Acts passed in December, 1759, and January and March, 1760.

Letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated June 24th, 1760, informing the Board that the settlements go on well.

Ordered, that such of the said Acts as have not expired by their own limitation, be sent to Sir Matthew Lamb for his opinion thereupon in point of law; and that he be desired forthwith to make his report upon the Acts of this province referred to him in December, 1759.

Read a memorial of Robert Grant, Esquire, to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, dated 23rd June, 1760, praying relief against an action now depending in Nova Scotia for the duties on a quantity of rum brought to Halifax for the use of his Majesty's ships.

Their lordships, upon consideration of the said memorial, were of opinion, that the question whether the rum mentioned therein is or is not subject to the duties imposed upon rum by an Act of the Legislature, must be adjudged and determined in the Courts there; and that it is not within the jurisdiction and department of this Board to give any directions for staying proceedings in any suit depending in those courts.

Wednesday, November 26, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board the copy of an Order of his Majesty in Council of the 11th instant, directing the Chief Engraver of Seals to prepare draughts of new Seals for America, and in preparing the same, to follow such instructions as he shall receive from this Board for that purpose. Ordered, that the Secretary do prepare a draught of instructions for the guidance and direction of the Seal engraver in preparing the said draughts, conformable to what has been done on the like occasions.

Friday, November 28, 1760

Read a letter from Charles Lawrence, Esquire, Governor of Nova Scotia, dated September 1st, 1760, acknowledging the receipt of the Board's letter of 16th May; inclosing Mr. Grant's memorial, respecting his removal from his seat in the Council; setting forth the falsity of the allegations in the said memorial; and giving an account of his general conduct and behaviour.


Journal of the

Board of Trade and Plantations

London, England
December 1760

Tuesday, December 2, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board a draught of instructions, prepared pursuant to order, for the guidance and direction of his Majesty's Seal Engraver, in preparing draughts of publick Seals for the Plantations; and the said draught having been approved, the Secretary was directed to sign it, and deliver it to the said Engraver. Read a letter from Jonathan Belcher, Esquire, President of the Council of Nova Scotia, to the Board, dated 26th October, 1760, acquainting their lordships with the death of Governor Lawrence, and transmitting,
Abstract of the state of the civil establishment for Nova Scotia in 1759.
Estimate of the civil establishment at Nova Scotia, 1761.

Wednesday, December 3, 1760

Their lordships then took into consideration the body of laws passed by the first General Assembly of his Majesty's Province of Nova Scotia, together with Sir Matthew Lamb's report thereupon; and having made some progress therein, agreed to take the said laws into further consideration to-morrow morning.

Thursday, December 4, 1760

Their lordships made a further progress in the consideration of the body of laws passed by the first General Assembly of the Province of Nova Scotia.

Tuesday, December 9, 1760

Their lordships made a further progress in the consideration of the laws passed by the first General Assembly of the Province of Nova Scotia.

Thursday, December 11, 1760

Their lordships took into further consideration the body of laws passed by the first General Assembly of the Province of Nova Scotia; and having gone through the same, ordered the draught of a letter to Mr. Belcher, President of the Council of the said province, containing their lordships' observations upon several of the said laws, to be prepared.

Friday, December 12, 1760

The draught of a letter to Mr. Belcher, President of the Council of Nova Scotia, having been prepared pursuant to order, was agreed to, transcribed and signed.

Wednesday, December 17, 1760

The Secretary laid before the Board an account delivered in by Captain Ball of expences he was at in bringing a packet of dispatches from Halifax in Nova Scotia to London, amounting to sixteen pounds.

Ordered, that the agent for Nova Scotia be directed to insert the said demand in the next account, which he shall have occasion to present to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, of expences incurred for the service of that colony.


More from the
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